Motivational theory

No two workers are alike; it can be a challenge to understand what makes each one tick so that you can apply the appropriate motivational technique. A number of motivational theories have been developed over time that can help you get the most out of your workers.

Motivational theory

Top 8 Theories of Motivation — Explained! Some of the most important theories of motivation are as follows: From the very beginning, when the human organisations were established, various thinkers have tried to find out the answer to what motivates people to work.

Different approaches applied by them have resulted in a number of theories concerning motivation. These are discussed in brief in that order. Drawing chiefly on his clinical experience, he classified all human needs into a hierarchical manner from the lower to the higher order.

In essence, he believed that once a given level of need is satisfied, it no longer serves to motivate man. Then, the next higher level of need has to be activated in order to motivate the man. Maslow identified five levels in his need hierarchy as shown in figure These are now discussed one by one: These needs are basic to human life and, hence, include food, clothing, shelter, air, water and necessities of life.

These needs relate to the survival and maintenance of human life. They exert tremendous influence on human behaviour. These needs are to be met first at least partly before higher level needs emerge. Once physiological needs are satisfied, they no longer motivate the man.

After satisfying the physiological needs, the next needs felt are called safety and security needs. These needs find expression in such desires as economic security and protection from physical dangers. Meeting these needs requires more money and, hence, the individual is prompted to work more.

What is Motivation?

Like physiological needs, these become inactive once they are satisfied. Man is a social being. He is, therefore, interested in social interaction, companionship, belongingness, etc.

It is this socialising and belongingness why individuals prefer to work in groups and especially older people go to work. These needs refer to self-esteem and self-respect. They include such needs which indicate self-confidence, achievement, competence, knowledge and independence.

The fulfillment of esteem needs leads to self-confidence, strength and capability of being useful in the organisation. However, inability to fulfill these needs results in feeling like inferiority, weakness and helplessness.

This level represents the culmination of all the lower, intermediate, and higher needs of human beings. In other words, the final step under the need hierarchy model is the need for self-actualization. This refers to fulfillment. The term self-actualization was coined by Kurt Goldstein and means to become actualized in what one is potentially good at.

According to Maslow, the human needs follow a definite sequence of domination. The second need does not arise until the first is reasonably satisfied, and the third need does not emerge until the first two needs have been reasonably satisfied and it goes on.

The other side of the need hierarchy is that human needs are unlimited. The main criticisms of the theory include the following:Motivational Theories definition Motivational theory is tasked with discovering what drives individuals to work towards a goal or outcome.

Businesses are interested in motivational theory because motivated individuals are more productive, leading to more economic use of resources. The expectancy theory of motivation suggests that when we are thinking about the future, we formulate different expectations about what we think will happen.

Three Major Theories of Motivation | Your Business

When we predict that there will most likely be a positive outcome, we believe that we are able to make that possible future a reality. Incentive theory distinguishes itself from other motivation theories, such as drive theory, in the direction of the motivation.

In incentive theory, stimuli "attract" a person towards them, . Motivational Theories definition Motivational theory is tasked with discovering what drives individuals to work towards a goal or outcome.

Motivational theory

Businesses are interested in motivational theory because motivated individuals are more productive, leading to more economic use of resources. Taylor's Theory of Scientifc Management. Frederick Taylor's theory of motivation states that most workers are motivated solely by the pay they receive for the work they do.

Jun 27,  · A number of motivational theories have been developed over time that can help you get the most out of your workers. Hierarchy of Needs Psychologist Abraham Maslow developed this theory.

Motivation Theories: Top 8 Theories of Motivation – Explained!